Take Your Writing Seriously (less social media!) by Jack Woodville London

..composing prose, whether fiction or non-fiction, is a creative and proactive process … Facebook, e-mail, and similar intrusions on your writing life tend to be reactive replies to the postings of others and the quick sharing of your own news or musings to which you expect others to react. The attention given to such writing tends to be in much shorter spurts than the attention given to a dedicated effort to compose a news report, a work of history, a short story, or even a chapter. Instead of such diversions counting toward the time you practice your craft, they just take up your time. –-Jack Woodville London

Melissa Donovan has worked as a technical writer, business writer, copywriter, professional blogger, and writing coach. The mission of her blog Writing Forward is to share helpful and inspiring creative writing tips to benefit the greater writing community and to advocate on behalf of all writers and artists. She invited guest author Jack Woodville London to blog about taking ourselves seriously, and it’s a message I for one need to internalize and set to action. Here’s Jack:

“What I find hard about writing,” Nora Ephron said, “is the writing.”

(Go to the original site to read the whole article; excerpts posted here)

1. Your first commitment is to write one thousand words a day, every day. Facebook, e-mail, Twitter, and instant messaging do not count.

Sit at your word processor today and compose a thousand words on the book, novel, memoir, poem, article, or short story that you’re writing. Tomorrow, edit those thousand words, revise them, and improve them. Recast the fuzzy sentences into the active voice. Make the subjects and verbs agree in number and tense, and eliminate the pronouns that might refer to more than one person, place, or thing so readers understand what you intended to say. After you’ve finished editing, write your next thousand words.

Then, and only then, may you take up the cudgel of Facebook and e-mail.

2. Your second commitment is to take yourself seriously. Form short- and long-term strategies for your writing. 

… Your space is your office, your desk, your chair, your word processor, your printer, your physical environment. Make it comfortable for you and for no one else, and consider it to be your office. Organize it. Keep your programs updated. Back up every word you type.

Your time is even more sacred. For the three or four or eight hours that you write each day, do not take telephone calls, do not send or receive emails or mess around with social media. During that block of time you should edit yesterday’s work, compose today’s thousand words, revisit your story outlines, and do the research for the piece you’re writing.

B. When you have achieved those goals, you can shift into the longer-term strategy. What does that include?

(What, you still haven’t switched over to the original site?)

Jack London is the author of A Novel Approach (To Writing Your First Book) and the award-winning books, French Letters: Virginia’s Wars and French Letters: Engaged in War. He has published some thirty literary articles and more than fifty book reviews. He has also studied creative writing at Oxford University and earned certificates at the Fiction Academy, St. Céré, France and Ecole Francaise, Trois Ponts, France. London lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife, Alice, and Junebug, the writing cat. For more information, please visit www.jwlbooks.com.

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About carolkean

novelist, reviewer, editor, book critic for Liberty Island and Perihelion Science Fiction; native prairie/guerilla gardener; champion of liberty, indie authors & underdogs; one of the top two reviewers in Editors &Preditors Poll 2015; Amazon Vine, NetGalley Top Reviewer
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