The A.I. Chronicles (Samuel Peralta): 13 authors + 13 great stories = 5 stars!

The A.I. Chronicles (The Future Chronicles)  delivers fascinating, provocative, well-written stories that belong in the hallowed halls of science fiction. Thirteen stories by thirteen accomplished, professional authors are a steal at only six dollars. Watch for my review in Perihelion Science Fiction ezine, March 12, 2015. An all-new issue goes live on the 12th of every month. Scroll down for author bios, photos, Twitter links and other fun stuff. (Unless you’re an Aspie, in which case, the “fun” may elude you. Details in a minute.)

Samuel Peralta * Elena E. Giorgi  * David Simpson * Chrystalla Thoma * Pavarti K. Tyler * Peter Cawdron Patrice Fitzgerald *  Susan Kay Quinn * Julie Czerneda * Alex Albrinck * Sam Best * Angela Cavanaugh * A.K. Meek * Logan Thomas Snyder * Ellen Campbell (Editor)

Every month I rewrite the opening paragraph of my review a dozen times. Rather than losing the old versions forever, I’m sneaking a few into this blog. Here’s Version One:

TECHNOLOGY HAS ALWAYS ACCELERATED too quickly for the Luddite. Just when some of us finally learned how to program the VCR, along came the DVD player, then satellite TV and the diabolical task of finding the mute button on the new remote. We were not scared, mind you; just annoyed. What’s scary is when scientists and techno wizards—the makers and masters of sleek, shiny new implements of mental torture, aka electronics –start speaking in hushed tones of The Singularity. The Terminator may have taken a short break from our collective nightmares when mutant flu strains, shape shifters and zombies seized the popular imagination, but now A.I. is the next big thing. No, don’t check under your bed for robots gone rogue. Artificial Intelligence hides in plain sight and everyday usage: your watch, your phone, that annoying voice in your car “recalculating” the route to a friend’s house. If that doesn’t alarm you, I dare you to check out the latest in science fiction ezines, magazines, books and movies. A good starting place is “The A.I. Chronicles,” the latest in Samuel Peralta’s acclaimed Future Chronicles series.

Here’s the second version I dumped:

MUTANT FLU STRAINS, ZOMBIES, AND SHAPE SHIFTERS, move over: the next big thing in science fiction is A.I. No, don’t check under your bed for robots gone rogue. Artificial Intelligence hides in plain sight: your watch, your phone, that annoying voice in your car “recalculating” the route to a friend’s house. While Neill Blomkam’s endearing “CHAPPiE” may inspire sympathy for A.I.s, Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates tell us that A.I. could render the human race obsolete. I wouldn’t be too quick to sell the house and start my bucket list, though. AI is “a necessary and inevitable culmination of the developments of the last few thousand years,” the next step in the evolution of the human race, according to author Samuel Peralta.

The final version starts like this:

A.I. IS THE NEXT STEP IN THE EVOLUTION of the human race, Samuel Peralta writes in his foreword to “The A.I. Chronicles,” the latest anthology in his acclaimed Future Chronicles series. Artificial Intelligence has already surpassed human abilities, he says. A.I. helps us calculate satellite launches, diagnose illnesses, and produce new medicines and pharmaceuticals.   

The technology that serves us, however, also enslaves us. Is this necessarily a bad thing?

My first go-to beta reader is a retired lab tech who has no formal training as a writer or reader but for fun, he reads Bertrand Russell, and he has some sort of Aspie-magic gift with math and calendars. He almost never knows when I’m just kidding (is that an Aspie thing?) so I shouldn’t be shocked or dismayed that he can’t tell my first goal in reviewing books is to have fun. (I don’t want to sound like I have a degree in English. Because I do. And if I’d had the aptitude to go with the passion, I’d have a PhD in genetic engineering, or something.)

“McDougall,” as he shall henceforth be called when I quote him in blogs, read the final verson of my March 2015 review and said:

Your review was largely an introduction to the myriad ways our invention of and dependence upon artificial intelligence could affect us, individually and as a species. Some of the stories are dystopian (a word you taught me), while others are benign or more optimistic. From a selfish point of view, I doubt that I will see robots learning on their own how to multiply, rule the world, implant AI modules in people, or annihilate the human race; I am likely to die before any of it could happen. But the possibilities written about do cause one to consider what’s down the road for our survivors. Perhaps as important, the selections spur my imagination.
This is a tangent, but your review brought me back to questions I don’t think anyone has has answered. (Correct me if I’m wrong – please.)
— How did it happen that I experience the universe through this body and not another?
— What is the mechanism of awareness? 
— What causes our subjective sense of I-ness? 
I’m persuaded it’s all in the brain, but I can’t even imagine how it works.
Back to the review itself. The terms you had to look up I had to look up. I’ve heard of the Turing Test, but have no idea what it is.  I know nothing about string theory.  I am comfortable with imaginary numbers, though. :<)
So you, as you have done before, opened a new world to me.  Was your review fun to read, you asked?  To an extent, it was like a textbook to me because of the above.  I don’t have the knowledge base to breeze through it, as I suspect nearly all of your intended readers would.  Your lively style, of course, made it an easier and more pleasurable read.  But I can’t honestly say it was unequivocally fun.

Not…fun? NOT FUN??How does this guy remain one of my best friends?

By now you may wonder if I ever talk about The Chronicles instead of me, me, me. Here is the publisher’s synopsis:

A.I.: Artificial Intelligence. Even today, machines that mimic human thinking surround us. As the intellectual feats of computing machines grow more and more astounding, will there be a day when their apparent intelligence approaches, or even surpasses, that of human beings? And what if these machines then become conscious, self-aware?

In this latest title in the acclaimed Future Chronicles series of speculative fiction anthologies, thirteen authors confront the question of the Singularity: at and beyond that point of time when A.I. becomes more than simply a human construct. From first awareness to omniscience, these original short stories explore that territory where human intelligence comes face-to-face with what is either its greatest hope, or its greatest threat.

The A.I. Chronicles features stories by bestselling author David Simpson (the Post-Human series), Prix Aurora winner Julie Czerneda (In the Company of Others), Amazon Kindle Scout sensation Peter Cawdron (Anomaly) plus ten more of today’s top authors in speculative and science fiction.

Note the overlapping authors with this anthology:

The Telepath Chronicles by David Gatewood,  Peter CawdronE.E. GiorgiSamuel Peralta Susan Kaye Quinn,  Autumn Kalquist Elle Casey,  Nina CroftTheresa KayTherin KniteMeiLin Miranda Chris Reher, Vincent TrigiliEndi WebbNicolas Wilson

      

 George Dvorsky writes in io9:

It’s been 50 years since Isaac Asimov devised his famous Three Laws of Robotics — a set of rules designed to ensure friendly robot behavior. Though intended as a literary device, these laws are heralded by some as a ready-made prescription for avoiding the robopocalypse. We spoke to the experts to find out if Asimov’s safeguards have stood the test of time — and they haven’t.

First, a quick overview of the Three Laws. As stated by Asimov in his 1942 short story “Runaround”: 1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

…Scifi aside, and as many people are apt to point out, these Laws were meant as a literary device. But as late as 1981, Asimov himself believed that they could actually work. Writing in Compute!, he noted, I have my answer ready whenever someone asks me if I think that my Three Laws of Robotics will actually be used to govern the behavior of robots, once they become versatile and flexible enough to able to choose among different courses of behavior. My answer is …. http://io9.com/why-asimovs-three-laws-of-robotics-cant-protect-us-1553665410

Samuel Peralta    @Semaphore

Chronicles Newsletter- http://smarturl.it/chronicles-news 

Samuel Peralta has won awards for his poetry worldwide, including a Palanca Award for his collection “Pacific”, from the BBC, the UK Poetry Society, and shortlists with the League of Canadian Poets and for the Arc Poem of the Year.

He has four books of poetry available – http://amzn.to/samuelperalta – “Sonata Vampirica”, “Sonnets from the Labtador”, “How More Beautiful You Are”, and “Tango Desolado” – all of which have been Amazon poetry bestsellers, debuting at #1 on the Amazon Kindle Hot New Releases in Poetry.

As @Semaphore he placed #1 worldwide in the voting for the Best Poetry on Twitter. His poems have appeared in Existere, the Malahat Review, MiPoesias, OCHO, Seedpod, Undercurrents, and other journals and anthologies.

At the forefront of the new media literary renaissance, he accepted an Innovative Technology Achievement Award from the Digital Literature Institute for ebook software development.

Chrystalla Thoma   @Chrystallathoma

Chrystalla likes writing about bratty, angsty boys and spunky girls in fantasy and science-fiction worlds. She writes mainly for a young adult public but not only (heed the warnings!)
She’s currently preparing a non-fiction book about dragons, because the truth must out, and is juggling two series (“Elei’s Chronicles” and “Boreal and John Grey”).

Greek Cypriot with a penchant for dark myths and good food. I have proven my tendency to settle down anywhere but at home by having lived and studied in France, England, Germany and Costa Rica, before returning to Cyprus two years ago.
I like to write about fantastical creatures, crazy adventures, and family bonds. I live in Cyprus with my husband and my vast herds of books. I write fantasy and science fiction, and my short stories can be found in Alienskin magazine, Lorelei Signal, the Shine Journal, Encounters Magazine, and Bards and Sages ezine i.a. I am also an author of MuseItUp Publishing, and my YA Urban Fantasy novella Dioscuri – retelling of the classic Greek myth of the same name – has been now released.
I am currently working on a few novels, including a vampire novel set in Cyprus, an epic fantasy trilogy, and a YA science fiction series.

Pavarti K Tyler   @PavartiKTyler

Award winning author of multi-cultural and transgressive literature, Pavarti K Tyler is an artist, wife, mother and number cruncher. She graduated Smith College in 1999 with a degree in Theatre. After graduation, she moved to New York, where she worked as a Dramaturge, Assistant Director and Production Manager on productions both on and off Broadway. Later, Pavarti went to work in the finance industry several international law firms. She now lives with her husband, two daughters and one very large, very terrible dog. She keeps busy working with fabulous authors as the Director of Marketing at Novel Publicity and penning her next genre bending novel.

Peter Cawdron  https://www.goodreads.com/Pcawdron  @PeterCawdron

Peter is an Australian science fiction writer, specialising in hard science fiction.

Hard science fiction is a misnomer as far as categories of literature go, as it sounds harsh and difficult to understand, but that is far from reality. Hard science fiction is simply plausible science fiction, fiction that is written in such a way as it conforms to the known laws of science, and that makes it more interesting, as there’s no magic wand the protagonist can wave to get out of trouble. Peter’s forays into hard science fiction could best be described as informative science fiction or enjoyable science fiction.

Peter is a fan of such classic science fiction writers as Philip K. Dick, Arthur C. Clarke and Michael Crichton and their influence on his style and story lines is readily apparent. You can follow Peter on Facebook or Twitter or find him posting some interesting tibit on his blog http://thinkingscifi.wordpress.com/

Patrice Fitzgerald: “I’m very active on Facebook (procrastinating when I should be writing!) newsletter at http://eepurl.com/zXpM1

PatriceFitzgerald.com   @PatriceFitz  Bestselling author Karma of the Silo is also a professional mezzo-soprano who sings in styles ranging from opera and Broadway to jazz.

Patrice has had many incarnations, including lawyer, writer, publisher, singer, mother, wife, and redhead… though not necessarily in that order. Before becoming a writer, Patrice practiced intellectual property law for fifteen years. She is the founder and CEO of a tiny indie press, eFitzgerald Publishing.

Patrice is the mother of four adult children. She lives in Connecticut on the water with her wonderful husband and is amazed and grateful to be making a living as a writer.

Susan Kaye Quinn   grew up in California, where she wrote snippets of stories and passed them to her friends during class. Her teachers pretended not to notice and only confiscated her stories a couple times.

Susan left writing behind to pursue a bunch of engineering degrees, but she was drawn back to writing by an irresistible urge to share her stories with her niece, her kids, and all the wonderful friends she’s met along the way.

She doesn’t have to sneak her notes anymore, which is too bad.

Susan writes from the Chicago suburbs with her three boys, two cats, and one husband. Which, it turns out, is exactly as a much as she can handle.

CONTACT SUSAN
Susan’s Website/Blog | Susan’s twitter | Susan’s Facebook Page
Susan’s Email: susankayequinn@comcast.net (less)

David Simpson  post-humannovel.com  @PostHuman09 

Bestselling author of the Post-Human Series and The God Killers

Amazon, just like the University of Toronto’s Academic Bridging program, gave me the opportunity I needed to prove myself. Because of them, a runaway who had to sleep in a shopping cart at sixteen, a high-school dropout with seemingly no prospects, went on to live in the best city in the world, meet the best woman in the world and marry her, attain two degrees from one of the top forty universities in the world, before achieving his dream of being a full-time author and having one of the best-selling science fiction series in the world. Visit my website to learn more at http://www.post-humannovel.com

* Ellen Campbell (Editor)

Julie E. Czerneda    @julieczerneda 

http://www.czerneda.com A former biologist, then writer and editor of non-fiction, in 1997 DAW Books published Julie’s first sf novel, “A Thousand Words for Stranger” and she hasn’t stopped since. Her work has received international acclaim, multiple awards,and best-selling status. You’ll find her work in anthologies as well, as she enjoys working with other writers. Julie is a popular speaker, whether on writing, science, or the use of science fiction to promote scientific literacy. Her recent adventures included being Guest of Honour for the national conventions of New Zealand and Australia, as well as Master of Ceremonies for Anticipation, the Montreal Worldcon.

Julie is currently writing the concluding trilogy to The Clan Chronicles, the SF series that began with her first novel. DAW Books has bought a further three titles in her fantasy series, Night’s Edge.

Oh, and when not writing or at conventions? Julie and her photographer husband grab their canoe and disappear into the glorious wilderness surrounding their central Ontario home.

Alex Albrinck  @AliomentiWriter  is a lifelong Ohio resident, where he lives with his wife and three children. When he’s not trying to be in three places at once with his active youngsters, he’s following local professional and collegiate sports teams, or possibly unscrambling a Rubik’s Cube. In lieu of sleep, he writes fiction. You can learn when his next work is available at alexalbrinck.com/Subscribe.

His debut novel, “A Question of Will,” explores themes of technological advancement, human potential (good and bad), and the love bonding a family together. The sequels follow Will Stark, his friends, and his family, in an epic quest full of advanced technology and Energy skills. He is currently working on several projects, including his new apocalyptic thriller series titled The Ravagers. http://www.alexalbrinck.com

 Sam Best   (no Twitter account? Sam!) grew up in Central Florida, five minutes from the Kennedy Space Center gates. Film school was next. I also worked for the Discovery Channel, owned my own lawn care business, and was a Director’s Assistant for a major motion picture. Now I travel the world and write along the way.  http://sam-best.com

Is “Bad” Writing Required For Massive Bestsellers? | Sam Best:

  Sam Best enjoying his while relaxing in the Swiss Alps!  

My debut novel, A QUESTION OF WILL, explores themes of technological advancement, human potential (good and bad), and the love bonding a family together. It reached the Amazon Top 100 in Science Fiction -> High Tech less than a week after publication. The sequels–PRESERVING HOPE, ASCENT OF THE ALIOMENTI, and BIRTH OF THE ALLIANCE–continue to follow Will’s adventures, bringing to life the technological and Energy advances he’s achieved in entirely new settings. I am currently drafting the fifth of seven novels in the series.

Angela Cavanaugh  @FictionByAngela

http://www.angelacavanaugh.com

*Two time recipient of an Honorable Mention in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest

* Emerging LA writer trying to navigate the perils of self promotion

Angela fell in love with flash fiction and began posting the short stories to her blog weekly. Now, Angela spends most of time working on writing, often polishing completed short stories and novels and creating new ones.

She has self-published 22 Short Scifi Stories: a flash fiction collection on Amazon. It reached #6 on the *best seller list. It is also available in audio.

In 2015, she will have two stories published in The Future Chronicles series. Also being released in 2015 is her debut novel, Otherworlders. ***Two time recipient of an Honorable Mention in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest.***

Her debut novel Otherworlders is available on Amazon.

22 Short Scifi Stories: a flash fiction collection available on Amazon and Audible
Summary – Sometimes you need a little fiction. This is a collection of twenty two scifi stories, most around 1000 words long. Enjoy tales of time travel, dystopian futures, apocalypse, aliens, genetic engineering, and much more…

Human Network (short story) available on Amazon.
Coming soon, Angela will have two stories published in The Future Chronicles series.
Angela is currently working on a number of other projects, and has a lot planned.
blog: angelacavanaugh.com

 E.E. Giorgi   @eegiorgi grew up in Tuscany, in a house on a hill that she shared with two dogs, two cats, 5 chickens, and the occasional batches of stick insects, newts and toads her dad would bring home from the lab. Today, E.E. Giorgi is a scientist and an award winning author and photographer. She spends her days analyzing genetic data, her evenings chasing sunsets, and her nights pretending she’s somebody else. On her blog, E.E. discusses science for the inquiring mind, especially the kind that sparks fantastic premises and engaging stories. Her debut novel CHIMERAS, a medical mystery, is a 2014 Readers’ Favorite International Book Award winner. MOSAICS is the sequel. GENE CARDS was reviewed in Perihelion. Her YA novel (a WIP, i.e. “work in progress” if sister Lori is reading this) is about teens with robotic body parts living in a futuristic, dystopian Earth.

NEWSLETTER: http://eepurl.com/SPCvT
BLOG: http://chimerasthebooks.blogspot.com/
PORTFOLIO: http://elenaedi.smugmug.com/
G+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+EEGiorgi/posts

A.K. Meek A.K. Meek   @Akmeek Reader, reviewer, writer of post apocalyptic/dystopian fiction  akmeek.com  https://www.goodreads.com/akmeek “I’ll tell more about myself sometime later” is about all I can dig up on this mysterious author.

Logan Thomas Snyder Logan Thomas Snyder Logan Thomas Snyder  @Logantarian

Author of the Violet series, The Lazarus Particle, This Mortal Coil and The Disappeared (A Silo Story). Contributor to the WOOL Gathering anthology. “Eve’s Awakening” forms an important basis to his Violet series of stories.

I’m an independent author and digital advertising consultant living in sunny South Florida. When I’m not consulting, I’m writing. When I’m not writing, I’m dreaming about people with more exciting lives than my own. Sooner or later one always circles back to the other, and the result is what you see before you. Recently I published my first original novel, ‘The Lazarus Particle,’ a sweeping science fiction epic.  I’m also the author of ‘This Mortal Coil’ and ‘The Disappeared (A Silo Story),’ a novel set in Hugh Howey’s world of ‘WOOL.’ directly through my site, loganthomassnyder.com

Peter Cawdron   @PeterCawdron (Brisbane, Australia) is a husband, father and “purveyor of fine science fiction” with a classic “Aussie” sense of humor.  His debut novel ANOMALY has sold over 50,000 copies.

“Hard science fiction is a misnomer as far as categories of literature go, as it sounds harsh and difficult to understand, but that is far from reality. Hard science fiction is simply plausible science fiction, fiction that is written in such a way as it conforms to the known laws of science, and that makes it more interesting, as there’s no magic wand the protagonist can wave to get out of trouble. Peter’s forays into hard science fiction could best be described as informative science fiction or enjoyable science fiction. ”

Peter is a fan of such classic science fiction writers as Philip K. Dick, Arthur C. Clarke and Michael Crichton and their influence on his style and story lines is readily apparent. You can follow Peter on Facebook or Twitter or find him posting some interesting tibit on his blog http://thinkingscifi.wordpress.com/

Bioengineers at Harvard University have created the first examples of cyborg tissue: Neurons, heart cells, muscle, and blood vessels that are interwoven by nanowires and transistors. http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/135207-harvard-creates-cyborg-flesh-thats-half-man-half-machine
—  More to come at my Perihelion review. See ya Friday, March 13 at 5:00pm in EDT at the “Launch Party” on Facebook!
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About carolkean

novelist, reviewer, editor, book critic for Liberty Island and Perihelion Science Fiction; native prairie/guerilla gardener; champion of liberty, indie authors & underdogs; one of the top two reviewers in Editors &Preditors Poll 2015; Amazon Vine, NetGalley Top Reviewer
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3 Responses to The A.I. Chronicles (Samuel Peralta): 13 authors + 13 great stories = 5 stars!

  1. pcawdron says:

    Reblogged this on THINKING SCI-FI and commented:
    The A.I. Chronicles launches this Friday. Seriously, this series keeps getting better and better

    Like

    • carolkean says:

      Peter, too late, I thought of a better way to end the review:
      — Then again, considering how “The End” ultimately ends, someone else can have my barstool next to Peter. Give it to Robert Lanza or Deepak Chopra, if Peter really thinks “we could already be the constructs of some other computer program, one running recursively, so that there’s no way to determine which layer of reality is real.”

      Well, I’m real. I know it, and I am happy to say that the thirteen stories in “The A.I. Chronicles” are a steal at only six dollars, and you really should buy the book. It’s easy. Click on the Amazon link at the top right. And make room for me on that bar stool. (“The A.I. Chronicles,” Edited by Ellen Campbell, Windrift Books) 4??? WHAT??? SAM!!! That was FIVE!!! stars ­Carol Kean
      🙂

      Like

    • carolkean says:

      FIVE stars. Not four. Ohhhh the horror. Typos can be deadly.

      Like

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