Leaving Berlin is a fascinating World War II story

“… set in Berlin, Germany in 1949, right after World War II,
“… Kanon does a wonderful job of taking the reader through some dangerous situation s while educating them on what happened after the war ended.” Marla is a great book reviewer and needs to meet David Lawlor.

More on “Leaving Berlin” from Telegraph reviewer  Jake Kerridge:
… One knows that a war will end some day: but what if peace entails unending misery?
This is the question asked by the American novelist Joseph Kanon, who has set all seven of his spy thrillers in the years immediately following the Second World War, when people were finding that evil had not so much been vanquished as become more nebulous.

… Kanon now returns for the first time in a decade to Berlin, the city he captured so well in his most famous book The Good German (filmed in 2006 with George Clooney).
… What makes his novel stand out is its portrayal of an East Berlin literally and psychologically gutted, “the charred wreck of the Reichstag looming up” over a city where the Russian occupiers make the Nazis seem almost human. But he also catches the uniquely dry, ineffable humour of the Berliners, who say they don’t mind the constant power cuts because they can’t see how bad the food is.
Kanon has a very distinctive style, employing staccato prose and elliptical dialogue that conveys information as quickly as possible so that the story hares along. …The novel is hugely exciting, and just as heart-breaking.

Views from the Passenger Seat

Leaving BerlinI know I’m not alone when I say I love a good book.  I also have become fascinated with history as I get older.  I’m so fascinated with history that I can’t seem to stay off of Ancestry.com researching my family history.

So when I won Leaving Berlin by Joseph Kanon through Goodreads.com, I was thrilled.  Not only is it set in Berlin, Germany in 1949, right after World War II, it also has been getting lots of buzz in the news.

This is my first Kanon book and I was pleasantly surprised at what a fantastic storyteller he is.  Kanon does a wonderful job of taking the reader through some dangerous situation s while educating them on what happened after the war ended.

The main character is Alex Meier, a Jewish journalist who escaped Berlin before the war and headed to America but is back in Berlin as…

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About carolkean

novelist, reviewer, editor, book critic for Liberty Island and Perihelion Science Fiction; native prairie/guerilla gardener; champion of liberty, indie authors & underdogs; one of the top two reviewers in Editors &Preditors Poll 2015; Amazon Vine, NetGalley Top Reviewer
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2 Responses to Leaving Berlin is a fascinating World War II story

  1. This is another interesting one, Carol. I read the GI Brides review – fascinating stories,I suspect. This, too, looks great. I with a guy whose granny was Christabel Bpelenburg – her husband was somehow involved in the plot to kill Hitler at the Wolf’s Lair. Christabel wrote her memoir (The Past is Myself and When I was German) about life in Berlin after the war. I haven’t read it myself but I thought her perspective on things was fascinating

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  2. That should read ‘Bielenberg’

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